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What makes wax different; an esthetician’s FYI.

According to a report compiled by Statista, in 2020, 6.39 Million people have had a professional waxing service 4 or more times. 

6.39 million people! Now I may not know what .39 means, haha, but 6 million people are getting waxed out there! Waxing is such a beloved service and I totally get it (because I love getting and doing a wax service) but it still seems mind blowing. There are a lot of different skin types… Which is why there is such a need for different types of wax and ingredients in those waxes. 

On the back of your wax package you should be able to find the ingredients that the wax contains. It’s important to know what your wax is made of, because this knowledge can serve you and your client in the treatment room. The ingredients will usually list from the ingredient with the most content to the least. The first ingredient is frequently what causes the adhesion to skin. Typically one of these three will be seen as the first ingredient:  Glyceryl Rosinate (rosin), Polycyclopentadiene Hydrogenate (synthetic), Triethylene Glycol Rosinate (hybrid). 

Estheticians care what ingredients are used on different skin types for a facial, right? Same applies to waxing ingredients, we are still working on the skin. The same consideration should take place for hair removal services.

Glyceryl Rosinate (rosin) is found in natural based waxes. Rosin comes from pine resin. When mixed with oils it becomes a liquid state called oleoresin. When this substance is exposed to air the oil evaporates and leaves a glossy hard material, Rosin. Natural waxes could be considered the classic wax for sure and have been known to be more biodegradable than other wax types. Great for resilient skin without allergies.

Polycyclopentadiene Hydrogenate is the base of synthetic rosin wax. The melting point for synthetic wax is usually a bit lower than natural waxes and can be used on those who have an allergy or developed an allergy to pine resin. Sensitive or reactive clients are ideal for this wax type. To be completely honest, I use synthetic wax on everyone with success. 

Here are a few of my favorite Glyceryl Rosinate (rosin) waxes

And an Alexander’s Aesthetics favorite:

Here are a few of my favorite Polycyclopentadiene Hydrogenate (synthetic rosin) waxes

Tell us your favorite type of wax or wax type on Instagram under the blog post.

By Trinnie M., Licensed Esthetician and Educator at Alexander’s Aesthetics